SAXO Courses - Fall 2012 – University of Copenhagen

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Course at BA- and MA level

 

Early Modern Histories of Weather and Climate in the West, c. 1550-1850
Lecturer: Bo Fritzbøger
Fall term 2012 Hum
ECTS Credits:  15 ECTS
Semester: 1 semester
Department(s): The SAXO Institute
Contact persons: Bo Fritzbøger, e-mail: bofritz@hum.ku.dk
 
 
Course description:  
The Early Modern period, c. 1550-1850, was in general distinguished by cold, wet, and stormy weather. It was the era of the so-called Little Ice Age, which had deep impact upon many aspects of social life. Among other things it undoubtedly contributed to a manifest interest in climatic conditions and changing weather that characterized the contemporary Enlightenment boost in science and the systematic conceptual appropriation of nature.
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From Civil Rights to Human Rights: Martin Luther King, the US Civil Rights Movement and Its Aftermath
Lecturer: Professor Helle Porsdam
Fall term 2012 Hum
ECTS Credits:  15 ECTS
Semester: 1 semester
Department(s):  The SAXO Institute
Contact persons:  Helle Porsdam, e-mail: porsdam@hum.ku.dk
 
 
Course description:  
Martin Luther King, Jr., is widely celebrated as an American civil rights hero. Yet, as recent historical research has shown, King’s nonviolent opposition to racism, militarism, and economic injustice had deeper roots and more radical implications than is commonly appreciated. Between the 1940s and the 1960s, King was influenced by and in turn reshaped the political cultures of the black freedom movement and democratic left. His vision of human rights drew on the diverse tenets of the African American social gospel, socialism, left-New Deal liberalism, Gandhian philosophy, and Popular Front internationalism.

King’s early leadership reached beyond southern desegregation and voting rights. As the freedom movement of the 1950s and early 1960s confronted poverty and economic reprisals, King championed trade union rights, equal job opportunities, metropolitan integration, and full employment. When the civil rights and antipoverty policies of the Johnson administration failed to deliver on the movement’s goals of economic freedom for all, King demanded that the federal government guarantee jobs, income, and local power for poor people. When the Vietnam war stalled domestic liberalism, King called on the nation to abandon imperialism and become a global force for multiracial democracy and economic justice.
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The Nordic Model 1814-2012
Lecturer: Lars Hovbakke Sørensen
Fall term 2012 Hum
ECTS Credits:  15 ECTS
Semester: 1 semester
Department(s): The SAXO Institute
Contact persons: Lars Hovbakke Sørensen, e-mail: lars.hovbakke@gmail.com
 
Course description:  
During the last 200 years many Scandinavians have perceived the so-called Nordic political culture, social structure and mentality as fundamentally different from that of the rest of Europe. An indication of this attitude is the use of the concept Norden instead of Northern Europe when talking of these countries. Norden has been perceived as something not European, not Catholic, anti-Rome, Anti-imperialist, non-colonial, non-exploitative, peaceful, small and social democratic.
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Victoria to Vendetta: Great Britain, the British Empire and the Imperial political and cultural legacy, c. 1880 to the present
Lecturer: Michael Langkjær
Fall term 2012 Hum
ECTS Credits:  15 ECTS
Semester: 1 semester
Department(s):  The SAXO Institute
Contact person:  Michael Alexander Langkjær, e-mail: langkjr@hum.ku.dk
 
 
Course description:  
The British Empire was the largest global imperial project the world has ever seen, as is evident from maps that showed a quarter of the world’s territory coloured red, indicating dominance over a fourth of the world’s population as well as most of its oceans. In 1880 the Empire was still very much a going concern and considered a civilizing force unlike any other. Yet the span of a single lifetime, e.g. that of Winston Churchill (1874-1965) would see the Empire not only declined and dissolved but seemingly more or less forgotten, with ‘imperialism’ having become a dirty word. 
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