Salbutamol increases leg glucose uptake and metabolic rate but not muscle glycogen resynthesis in recovery from exercise

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Content: Exercise blunts the effect of beta2-agonist on peripheral glucose uptake and energy expenditure. Whether such attenuation extends into recovery is unknown.

Objective: To examine the effect of beta2-agonist on leg glucose uptake and metabolic rate in recovery from exercise.

Design: Using leg arteriovenous balance technique and analyses of thigh muscle biopsies, we investigated the effect of beta2-agonist (24 mg oral salbutamol) versus placebo on leg glucose, lactate, and oxygen exchange before, during, and 0.5-5-h in recovery from quadriceps exercise, as well as on muscle glycogen resynthesis and activity in recovery.

Participants: Twelve healthy lean young men.

Results: Before exercise, leg glucose uptake was 0.42±0.12 and 0.20±0.02 mmol×min-1 (mean±SD) for salbutamol and placebo (= .06), respectively, while leg oxygen consumption was around two-fold higher (< .01) for salbutamol than placebo (25±3 versus 14±1 mL×min-1). No treatment differences were observed in leg glucose uptake, lactate release, and oxygen consumption during exercise. But in recovery, cumulated leg glucose uptake, lactate release, and oxygen consumption was 21 mmol (95%CI: 18-24, = .018), 19 mmol (95%CI: 16-23, < .01), and 1.8 L (95%CI: 1.6-2.0, < .01) higher for salbutamol than placebo, respectively. Muscle glycogen content was around 30% lower (< .01) for salbutamol than placebo in recovery, whereas no treatment differences were observed in muscle glycogen resynthesis or glycogen synthase activity.

Conclusions: Exercise blunts the effect of beta2-agonist on leg glucose uptake, but this attenuation diminishes in recovery. Beta2-agonist increases leg lactate release in recovery, which may relate to glycolytic trafficking due to excessive myocellular glucose uptake.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
ISSN0021-972X
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19 Oct 2021

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Endocrine Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

    Research areas

  • Faculty of Science - Thermogenesis, Adrenoceptor, Glycogenolysis, cAMP, PKA, Beta-agonist, Clenbuterol

ID: 282531877