Ancient Greek port uncovered – University of Copenhagen

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13 November 2014

Ancient Greek port uncovered

Archaeologist working on the northwest side of the entrance canal (V. Tsiairis). Greek Ministry of Culture.

Archaeologist working on the northwest side of the entrance canal (V. Tsiairis). Greek Ministry of Culture.

Exploring an ancient submerged port
In Greece Bjørn Lovén, associate professor at the Saxo Institute, is part of the Lechaion Harbour Project funded by the Augustinus Foundation; a marine archaeological project exploring an old submerged harbour near the ancient city of Corinth using 3-D parametric sub-bottom profiler to examine the area.

Important entry point
The ancient port played an important role as an entry point for the busy sea traffic of the Gulf of Corinth. The harbour covered a total area of 2,750 square meters. It ran 911 meters along the modern Gulf of Corinth coastline and the entrance channel to the port lay on the harbor’s eastern part. The channel is 8.9 meters wide while a western and a middle mole were also found west of it.

For more

Read the article Ancient Greek Port Revealed Near Corinth, Peloponnese at greekreporter.com

Read the article Corinth’s Submerged Port Mapped at archaeology.org (website for the magazine Archaeology).

For more about the excavations of the harbour near Corinth go to the facebook profile of the Lechaion Harbour Project.